• Development and use of modern software tools and open access data for sustainable water management

    The use of open source software and programming languages in combination with open access data enables the efficient generation of information to help stakeholders to act for sustainable water management. Big data for water management has arrived...

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  • Water footprint: a key indicator to help public policy on water, agriculture and innovative catchment management.

    We executed the water footprint of all productive sectors in all river basins in Colombia to support water policy and water action. The work stimulates the development of water funds, Investments in water efficient and climate proof agriculture and water stewardship.

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  • We empower people and organisations to use their watersheds in a more sustainable way

    Our WATERDATA4ACTION approach engages stakeholders in sustainable watershed management on the basis of open access to fully understandable data and information.

    Get active for your watershed

  • We help farmers use less water, be more productive and more sustainable!

    Using our cost efficent water footprint software and our deep knowledge and expertise in farming and water, we support farmers to use water better and at the same time increase farm productivity and be more water sustainable.

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Tools

Tools for sustainable water use

Recent articles

We supported AWS implementation at Iberesparragal citrus farm in Spain, first AWS gold certification in Europe

Water Stewardship in practice

BLUE-THUMB-UP: a free webtool to help farmers improve their water use, yields and sustainability.

Launching BLUE-THUMB-UP

GAWFC is a software tool that calculates green and blue water footprints of crops at multiple geographic locations

Geographic Agricultural Water Footprint Calculator - GAWFC

Learn more about us by reading our published articles and research. Enjoy!

Continue learning about us in our GSI news section

Cities often not contribute so much to health. People breath polluted air. Water is often nearly undrinkable. Food might be of low quality. Waste lies around and people might feel unsafe. While it is not the whole solution, urban farming makes life in cities better in many aspects.

 

Half of the people that live on Earth now live in cities. And this is expected to increase rapidly. In many places this living is not so good. Cities often not contribute so much to health. People breath polluted air. Water is often nearly undrinkable. Food might be of low quality. Waste lies around and people might feel unsafe. While it is not the whole solution, urban farming makes life in cities better in many aspects.

 

Urban farming is the cultivation of food in urban areas. Often this is done by people from the same neighbourhood. People meet each other and work together to create community gardens. They learn how to grow plants, how much water they need, how important healthy soils are for healthy food. They get to know each other better and they eat the food they grow. Often, people get a better understanding of healthy food.

 

 

 

Urban farming greens towns with plants, bushes and trees. Greener towns are better to live in. Physically, the temperature in green towns is more moderate. Excess rainwater is stored. And, air pollution is captured by trees. Green areas generate a higher feeling of comfort with the people living in them.

 

 

 

Urban farming is a movement of citizens not of companies or the government. The people in the urban farming movement take pride in what they achieve together. Citizens feel empowered by the direct influence they have on what their city looks like.

From our experience it is clear that urban farming makes cities healthier, greener and more social.

Good Stuff International is – together with many partners and citizens - financially and technically supporting a large Urban Farming project  in the South of the Netherlands called ¨Urban Farmers for Liveability". The project receives 50% funding from the Provincial Government of North Brabant in the Netherlands. The rest of the funding is invested by all the partners in the project. The project is led by the Conceptenbouwers Foundation.